African Migrant Flood – New Policy Allows Unlimited Migration

The Washington Post is praising a guy from Mauritania, an African nation, for helping more destitute Muslim migrants overcrowd apartments and homes in Cincinnati, taxing the town’s resources and possibly breaching occupancy regulations.

Even this individual, who helps to channel the influx of illegal immigrants into the country, claims that the federal government is simply allowing too many people to enter at once.

In 2000, Oumar Ball, a native of Mauritania, a small, mostly Muslim country in West Africa, moved to Cincinnati. He had obtained U.S. citizenship by 2010. He is currently trying to relocate as many of his fellow Muslims as possible to Cincinnati’s Mount Airy neighborhood. However, he has frequently encountered Queen City’s housing issues.

There is no “right to shelter,” and the city lacks a shelter system. Ball has therefore had trouble locating accommodations for his immigrant buddies. As a result of the housing crisis, he has unlawfully hoarded them in volunteer homes and small flats, including his own.

“It’s not unusual to discover two-bedroom apartments containing 10 or 14 individuals,” added Ousmane Sow, a fellow Mauritania activist from Cincinnati. “And the reason for this is that none of us like to see Mauritanians on the streets.”

The issue is also becoming worse. According to Lockland’s administrator and fire chief, Doug Wehmeyer, the number of Mauritania migrants has doubled to 3,000.

Ball has up to fifty illegal residents living in his own home.

In Ohio, single-family house occupancy rates typically limit the number of occupants to two per bedroom. However, authorities may occasionally make exceptions and allow four individuals to share a bedroom if they are underage. However, it is undoubtedly illegal to house 14 or 15 individuals in a two-bedroom flat. Additionally, Ohio often prohibits apartment living for families larger than five, and most definitely not for huge gatherings of unrelated individuals.

Ball, for example, has been assisting these migrants in finding employment in the riverfront city’s meatpacking district. Mauritian immigrants have been savorily consuming jobs at Tyson Foods and other manufacturing facilities, such as Johnson & Johnson and General Electric.

Even Mr. Ball and his pals are feeling the strain of the migration tsunami from the war-torn African nation. He believes that the federal government should have started imposing immigration restrictions a long time ago.

Ball told the newspaper, “We would appreciate it if they could temporarily close our borders.” That would be fantastic, because there are now far too many people coming. Everyone is worn out.

Ball’s wife, Aminata Ba, is also struggling to make ends meet. Ball is struggling to make ends meet in the Amazon warehouse where she works because her family and the hundreds of other Mauritanian migrants who come to her for food, clothing, and assistance are taxing her meager income, especially since Ball recently lost his job.

Ba said to the Post, “We have had over 300 individuals come through this house because they know my husband has a heart.” “For them, I purchase deodorant, toothpaste, soap, and everything else. When they cross the border, they have one shirt and one pair of pants.

She echoed the sentiments of the majority of Americans over President Joe Biden’s open-border policy when she declared, “I can’t keep doing this over and over again.”

Author: Steven Sinclaire

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